1. Takesada Matsutani, Wave 84-88, 1984-1988, vinyl wood glue and graphite on canvas

    Takesada Matsutani, Wave 84-88, 1984-1988, vinyl wood glue and graphite on canvas

    (Source: galerierichard.com, via miguelcarlos)

  2. 24/7 

    image

    subway poster frame (detail), Shibuya (Tokyo), 18 July 2014

    The fairest order is a random heap of sweepings.
    — Heraclitus, Fragment 46.
    ex Daniel W. Graham, trans. and ed., The Texts of Early Greek Philosophy : The Complete Fragments and Selected Testimonies of the Major Presocratics (2010)

    Fanno to par, etto to mar,
    Timin tudo, tido,
    Foll to gar in, mitno to par,
    Eido, teido, meido

    — sung by “children of the caretaker, I should think,” in Virginia Woolf, chapter entitled “Present Day,” The Years (1937)
    (could be Hugo Ball)
     

    (Source: asfaltics)

  3. 24/7 

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    detail, one of several weathered photographs of important visitors to Ōyamazumi Jinja / 大山祇神社 (*). here, temple priest, with president and other officials of Nippon Air System, 11 October 1989 (Heisei 8).
    22 July 2014

    For souls it is death to become water, for water death to become earth, but from earth water is born, and from water soul.
    — Heraclitus, Fragment 64.
    ex Daniel W. Graham, trans. and ed., The Texts of Early Greek Philosophy : The Complete Fragments and Selected Testimonies of the Major Presocratics (2010)
     

    (Source: asfaltics)

  4. (via ferr)

  5. 15/7 

    image

    coast of Alaska, edge scoured/obscured by clouds
    26 June 2014

    Thales “Everything is water,” i.e. everything is obedience.
    Simone Weil. First and Last Notebooks, translated by Richard Rees (1970): 338
     

    (Source: asfaltics)

  6. 15/7 

    Paul Kelly, Deeper Water

    (Source: hotdamnsebastianstan, via conservativeedge)

    2 plays
  7. 9/7
    Takahashi Shocachiro, poems fall
  8. 9/7
    Eisbär(Polar Bear; The Stealthy Watcher), Alfred Kubin, 1901 - 1902

    Eisbär(Polar Bear; The Stealthy Watcher), Alfred Kubin, 1901 - 1902

    (Source: animus-inviolabilis, via mamotretos)

  9. 9/7 

    At Gate C22 in the Portland airport
    a man in a broad-band leather hat kissed
    a woman arriving from Orange County.
    They kissed and kissed and kissed. Long after
    the other passengers clicked the handles of their carry-ons
    and wheeled briskly toward short-term parking,
    the couple stood there, arms wrapped around each other
    like he’d just staggered off the boat at Ellis Island,
    like she’d been released at last from ICU, snapped
    out of a coma, survived bone cancer, made it down
    from Annapurna in only the clothes she was wearing.

    Neither of them was young. His beard was gray.
    She carried a few extra pounds you could imagine
    her saying she had to lose. But they kissed lavish
    kisses like the ocean in the early morning,
    the way it gathers and swells, sucking
    each rock under, swallowing it
    again and again. We were all watching —
    passengers waiting for the delayed flight
    to San Jose, the stewardesses, the pilots,
    the aproned woman icing Cinnabons, the man selling
    sunglasses. We couldn’t look away. We could
    taste the kisses crushed in our mouths.

    But the best part was his face. When he drew back
    and looked at her, his smile soft with wonder, almost
    as though he were a mother still open from giving birth,
    as your mother must have looked at you, no matter
    what happened after — if she beat you or left you or
    you’re lonely now — you once lay there, the vernix
    not yet wiped off, and someone gazed at you
    as if you were the first sunrise seen from the earth.
    The whole wing of the airport hushed,
    all of us trying to slip into that woman’s middle-aged body,
    her plaid bermuda shorts, sleeveless blouse, glasses,
    little gold hoop earrings, tilting our heads up.


    Ellen BassGate C22

    (Source: yourdailypoem.com, via rabbit-light)

  10. The Drawing Machine - Moon, Harvey (US)

    The Drawing Machine - Moon, Harvey (US)

    (Source: sublimotion)

  11. 26/6 

    Yannis Kyriakides - Wordless (Pensioner_0496)

    (Source: babilano, via cfmc)

    149 plays
  12. / on Instagram http://ift.tt/1pgutF9

    / on Instagram http://ift.tt/1pgutF9

    (Source: reas)

  13. 24/6 

      We have reached the point where ‘consumption’ has grasped the whole of life; where all activities are sequenced in the same combinatorial mode; where the schedule of gratification is outlined in advance, one hour at a time; and where the ‘environment’ is complete, completely climatized, furnished, and culturalized. In the phenomenology of consumption, the general climatization of life, of goods, objects, services, behaviors, and social relations represents the perfected, ‘consummated,’ stage of evolution which, through articulated networks of objects, ascends from pure and simple abundance to a complete conditioning of action and time, and finally to the systematic organization of ambiance, which is characteristic of the drugstores, the shopping malls, or the modern airports in our futuristic cities.

    - Jean Baudrillard, Consumer Society (1970, p. 21)

    (via seawaters)

  14. Vasily Kandinsky, Ladies in Crinolines, 1909

    Vasily Kandinsky, Ladies in Crinolines, 1909

    (Source: russian-style, via 50watts)